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TPS

IISLG can help you renew or late-file your TPS application:

TPS is a temporary benefit that does not lead to lawful permanent resident status or give any other immigration status. But the beneficiaries of TPS: 

  • Are not removable from the United States
  • Can obtain an employment authorization document (EAD)
  • May be granted travel authorization


Also, if you are granted TPS, you cannot be detained by DHS based on your immigration status in the United States.


Below are the countries that currently have been designated with TPS: 


To be eligible for TPS, you must:

  • Be a national of a country designated for TPS, or a person without nationality who last habitually resided in the designated country;
  • File during the open initial registration or re-registration period, or you meet the requirements for late initial filing during any extension of your country’s TPS designation (Late initial filers see ‘Filing Late’ section below);
  • Have been continuously physically present (CPP) in the United States since the effective date of the most recent designation date of your country; and
  • Have been continuously residing (CR) in the United States since the date specified for your country. (See your country’s TPS web page to the left). The law allows an exception to the continuous physical presence and continuous residence requirements for brief, casual and innocent departures from the United States. When you apply or re-register for TPS, you must inform USCIS of all absences from the United States since the CPP and CR dates. USCIS will determine whether the exception applies in your case.


You may NOT be eligible for TPS or to maintain your existing TPS if you:

  • Have been convicted of any felony or two or more misdemeanors committed in the United States;
  • Are found inadmissible as an immigrant under applicable grounds in INA section 212(a), including non-waivable criminal and security-related grounds;
  • Are subject to any of the mandatory bars to asylum. These include, but are not limited to, participating in the persecution of another individual or engaging in or inciting terrorist activity;
  • Fail to meet the continuous physical presence and continuous residence in the United States requirements;
  • Fail to meet initial or late initial TPS registration requirements; or
  • If granted TPS, you fail to re-register for TPS, as required, without good cause.


Once you are granted TPS, you must re-register during each re-registration period to maintain TPS benefits. This applies to all TPS beneficiaries, including those who were initially granted by USCIS, an Immigration Judge, or the BIA. 


Late Re-Registration for TPS
USCIS may accept a late re-registration application with a showing of good cause for filing late.  It is important to note that if you file your TPS re-registration application late, processing may be delayed and can lead to gaps in your work authorization.


Late Initial Filing for TPS
You can apply for TPS for the first time during an extension of your country’s TPS designation period. If you qualify to file your initial TPS application late, you must still independently meet all the TPS eligibility requirements listed in the Eligibility section above.



Latest TPS Updates from USCIS

ALERT: The termination of TPS for Nepal and Honduras will not go into effect until further notice.  As required by the court-approved stipulation in Bhattarai v. Nielsen, No. 19-cv-731 (N.D. Cal), USCIS will extend appropriate TPS-related documentation (Employment Authorization Documents; Forms I-797, Notice of Action; and Forms I-94, Arrival/Departure Record) for eligible beneficiaries of TPS Honduras and TPS Nepal similar to the way it has for the TPS beneficiaries in Ramos v. Nielsen, No. 18-cv-01554 (N.D. Cal), a case that challenges the terminations of TPS for Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti, and El Salvador. The terminations of TPS for Nepal and Honduras will not go into effect while appeals are pending in Ramos, a case that presents similar issues to those presented in Bhattarai.

ALERT: Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen announced her decision to extend the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for South Sudan for 18 months through Nov 3, 2020. Do not pay for or submit any form until USCIS updates official re-registration information on this webpage.

Read more: Secretary Of Homeland Security Kirstjen M. Nielsen Announcement On Temporary Protected Status For South Sudan

ALERT: On Oct. 3, 2018, in Ramos, et al. v. Nielsen, et al., No. 18-cv-01554 (N.D. Cal. Oct. 3, 2018) (PDF, 458 KB), tthe U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California enjoined DHS from implementing and enforcing the decisions to terminate Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti, and El Salvador, pending further resolution of the case

For additional information, please see the March 1, 2019, Federal Register Notice,specific TPS country pages available on the USCIS website, and the Update on Ramos v. Nielsen page on the USCIS website.